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>Delivering GREAT service should not be difficult. It should be woven into the job so that it is not an either/or choice, nor an add-on, but simply the way one does his job. I find acronyms make it easier to remember the key components of GREAT service, so the five tips I’d like to share are:

Greet the customer with appropriate enthusiasm. Make them feel welcome and appreciated immediately. Walt Disney referred to customers as “guests” because he believed most people treat guests in their home a little more special than they even do other members of their family. Is it not typical to clean the house, stock the refrigerator and get prepared for guests to visit your home? Same analogy can apply to a business. Are you “show ready”, clean, stocked and prepared for your “guests”?

Respond quickly to the customer and be available to assist when they want you. The customer may have questions immediately or they may wish to educate themselves alone until they are ready to purchase your product or services. Be accessible whether by phone or in person and competently prepared to help them. You may also anticipate their needs and be proactive by observing their body language, voice tone or facial expressions to know if you can assist even before you are asked.

Engage with the customer in a manner that relates to their emotions. For example, a patient in a hospital who is very sick, is not looking for excitement and enthusiasm by the employee taking care of them. They want concern and empathy. However, a patient who has just had a new baby may very well want to see some of the same delight and thrill they feel by the hospital employee taking care of them.

Accuracy in delivering what was promised. It doesn’t matter how well you smile or give good eye contact if you don’t give the customer what you said you would whether this is answering their billing questions or filling their food order at Burger King correctly. Doing the job right the first time is key to developing trust with a customer.

Thank the customer for their business. For most products and services offered in today’s world, your customer has several choices of where to go. Just as you showed your appreciation for their business when you greeted them, don’t let them get out your door or end the phone call without another reiteration of your appreciation for them choosing you and your business.

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2 Response Comments

  • Anonymous  March 17, 2010 at 8:18 am

    >I agree with all you say. The key is to only employ people in the first place that truly believe in treating the customer fantastically is a major reason for their job. Don't put up with people representing you that appear strained and false. If they have difficulty doing that without training, (and more training), and it does not come naturally to them, replace them.
    Psychometric testing to help achieve the desirable personal profile for 'the job' is a good first start for assessment based on your existing star performers, then hone it to suit individual job requirements. john@busguy dot com

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